Lawmakers introduce legislation to prevent child deaths in hot cars

Posted: Updated:
WASHINGTON -

Members of Congress introduced legislation Wednesday to help prevent the deaths of children left inside of locked, hot vehicles.

The legislation would require cars to have systems to notify drivers if there is a passenger in the backseat.

Officials say that nearly 1,000 children have died after being left in a hot car for too long. It most recently happened in Lakewood after the toddler’s parents became confused about who was watching the baby.

RELATED: Auto industry stepping up effort to remind parents not to leave kids in cars 
RELATED: Authorities: Miscommunication may have led to child being left to die inside hot car 

“Parents are fallible. What a newsflash. Parents are busy,” says Sen. Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut.

The Hot Cars Act would force the federal government to make sure all new cars had a child safety alert system, which would alert drivers if someone is still in the back seat. Some cars come equipped with it now and there are some smartphone apps that also alert drivers.

"We have to change the perception in Washington and around the country about what the government can do to solve problems,” says Rep. Tim Ryan of Ohio.

The lawmakers were joined by parents who lost their children after accidentally leaving them inside hot vehicles.

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