Fordham University plays vital role in recording world quakes, blasts

Earthquakes and blasts felt around the world are recorded behind a locked vault at Fordham University.

A broadband seismometer sits 25 feet below ground at the school's seismic station, which is the oldest in the city. The device detects quakes and even construction on projects like the Tappan Zee Bridge. According to Dr. Benjamin Crooker, who's a member of the university's physics department, the seismic wave information is electronically transmitted to the U.S. Geological Survey in Colorado. Crooker says the device arrived at Fordham in 2002, but the station has housed seismic machines since the early 1900s.

While the Bronx does sit on a fault line, Crooker reassures residents it's unlikely a quake will hit soon. However, he adds anything is possible.

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