Study: Prescription orders lost in translation

A computer program that allows Spanish-language speakers to read prescription labels written in English could be putting patients in danger because the translations are many times wrong, a new study says.

The Pediatrics Journal study, which was conducted in the Bronx, found that more than 50 percent of prescriptions translated by 286 pharmacies were inaccurate.

"It's our responsibility as doctors to make sure that before the patient leaves the office, they understand fully what they need to do," says Dr. Mario Garcia, of Montefiore Medical Center.

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